please


please
please vb Please, gratify, delight, rejoice, gladden, tickle, regale mean to make happy or to be a cause of happiiress.
Please usually implies an agreement with one's wishes, tastes, or aspirations and a happiness which ranges from mere content and the absence of grounds for displeasure to actual elation
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the family was pleased with the daughter's marriage

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the aim of poetry is to please

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the suggestion did not please him

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he may apply himself ... to feeding and protecting his family, but he no longer need strain to pleaseEdmund Wilson

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fangless perceptions which will please the conservative power— Mailer

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Gratify (compare gratifying under PLEASANT) suggests an even stronger measure of satisfaction than please and is normally positive in its implication of pleasure
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it gratifies us to imagine that ... we have reached a point on the road of progress beyond that vouchsafed to our benighted predecessors— Ellis

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it gratified him to have his wife wear jewels; it meant some-thing to him— Cather

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he had a sense of humor in his peculiar quiet way, but he never gratified it by proofs of the obvious— Theodore Sturgeon

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Delight stresses the emotional rather than the intellectual quality of the reaction, though the latter is often also implied; it suggests intense, lively pleasure that is not only keenly felt but usually vividly expressed in outward signs
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O, flatter me; for love delights in praises— Shak.

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the girl was embarrassed and delighted by the effusive attention that followed— Hervey

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she was as delighted as if he had given her a Christmas present all wrapped in shining paper— Maclnnes

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Rejoice implies a happiness that exceeds bounds and reveals itself openly (as in smiles, in song, in festivities, or in enthusiastic effort)
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rejoice, you men of Angiers, ring your bells— Shak.

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Hendrik worked, rejoicing in the strength that God had given him— Cloete

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Gladden sometimes is indistinguishable from rejoice except in rarely suggesting excess of emotion and in being usually transitive
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a small pleasantry frankly uttered by a patron, gladdens the heart of the dependent— Irving

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It often, however, connotes a raising of the spirits, or a cheering or consoling in depression or grief
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the comrades of the dead girl assemble in the temple on certain days to gladden her spirit with songs and dances— Hearn

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Tickle and regale involve the idea of delight, but they are often less dignified in their connotations.
Tickle implies such pleasurable sensations as tingles and thrills or suggests an almost physical gratification
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food that tickles the palate

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Sometimes, with reference to physical tickling, it suggests provocation of laughter
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the mimic court of justice in the orchard tickled him immensely— Deland

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the idea of himself as a parson tickles him: he looks down at the black sleeve on his arm, and then smiles slyly— Shaw

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Regale connotes huge enjoyment or a feasting upon what gives pleasure
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Mr. Sycamore was regaling himself with the discomfiture of Lady Charlotte— H. G. Wells

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would always regale them generously with madeira, sherry or whiskey, rich cake, and richer stories— Chapman-Huston

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Analogous words: *satisfy, content: beguile, *while, wile
Antonyms: displease: anger: vex

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Please — may refer to:* PLEASE, a keyword in the INTERCAL programming language * Please (album), an album by Pet Shop Boysongs * Please , a song by The Apples in Stereo from the album Velocity of Sound * Please (Toni Braxton song), a song by Toni Braxton… …   Wikipedia

  • Please — Studioalbum von Pet Shop Boys Veröffentlichung 24. März 1986 Aufnahme 1984 1985 Label …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Please — Please, Please Saltar a navegación, búsqueda «Please, Please/Don t Stop Me Now» Sencillo de McFLY del álbum Motion In The Ocean Publicación 17 de julio de 2006 Formato CD Single …   Wikipedia Español

  • please — (v.) early 14c., to be agreeable, from O.Fr. plaisir (Fr. plaire) to please, from L. placere to be acceptable, be liked, be approved, related to placare to soothe, quiet, from PIE root *p(e)lag to smooth, make even (Cf. Gk. plax, gen. plakos… …   Etymology dictionary

  • please — [plēz] vt. pleased, pleasing [ME plaisen < MFr plaisir < L placere, to please, akin to placidus, gentle, mild, placare, to calm, soothe < IE * plāk , flat, smooth < base * plā > PLAIN1] 1. to be agreeable to; give pleasure to;… …   English World dictionary

  • please to — please, also (now rare) please to A polite formula equivalent to ↑if you please above, now felt as imperative, perhaps orig from the older please it you or please it (sometimes printed pleaseth in Shakespeare) or please you may it please you • •… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Please — Please, v. i. 1. To afford or impart pleasure; to excite agreeable emotions. [1913 Webster] What pleasing scemed, for her now pleases more. Milton. [1913 Webster] For we that live to please, must please to live. Johnson. [1913 Webster] 2. To have …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Please — Студийный альбом Pet Shop Boys …   Википедия

  • please — The use of please by itself, as in Will you come in, please?, is a reduced form of may it (so) please you. It was first recorded in the 17c, but was not used by Shakespeare, whose shortest form is please you …   Modern English usage

  • Please — Please, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pleased}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pleasing}.] [OE. plesen, OF. plaisir, fr. L. placere, akin to placare to reconcile. Cf. {Complacent}, {Placable}, {Placid}, {Plea}, {Plead}, {Pleasure}.] 1. To give pleasure to; to excite… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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